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A Primer on Underage Drinking

A recent report on Medscape News Today notes that teen drinking is down in 2011 - in fact, underage drinking has fallen to its lowest point in 3 years. This is good news for law enforcement and those in the alcohol industry who have been vigilant in attempting to crack down on underage drinking. Selling alcohol to minors can result in criminal charges, fines and most likely the loss of your job. For alcohol, it is your legal responsibility to make sure the person is 21 or older. If you intentionally help someone under 21 obtain or attempt to obtain alcohol, it's considered "aiding and abetting." This means you cannot help an underage person buy alcohol, you cannot buy for alcohol for them or give them any alcohol.

washington acceptable id

Reducing the number of underage drinkers can be as easy as knowing what to look for on a customer's ID. At America's Alcohol Certified Education Association, we provide alcohol server training that teaches prospective bartenders and servers how to quickly identify proper identification as well as spotting intoxicated customers, and knowing just how much alcohol is in a beverage. With the widespread use of fake IDs, it can be difficult to make sure you're serving to an of-age customer. There are a few guidelines for spotting fake IDs though:
  1. Compare the person in the picture to the one who is presenting it. Often, this is the biggest clue.
  2. Feel the ID for cuts in the birthdate and/or picture area. They can be subtle.
  3. Compare the identification document to the ID checking guide.
  4. Look for different types of ink on the ID, color contrasts, smudges and misprints.
  5. Overall, trust your instincts. Servers have the right to refuse sale to anyone for any reason.
Together we can help stop underage drinking and promote responsible alcohol sales and service. If you're looking to get your mandatory alcohol server training certificate, choose online alcohol classes that you can take from the comfort of your own home with AACEA. Sign up for one of our convenient classes at www.aacea.com!

AACEA is an Approved Alcohol Certification Program in Washington and Oregon!

If you're a server looking to get your mandatory alcohol server training certificate in Washington or Oregon, look no further than AACEA. The Oregon Liquor Control Commission and the Washington State Liquor Control Board both require a "server permit" for anybody who is employed by a licensee - a business with a permit to serve alcohol (Restaurants, Bars, Restaurants, Deli's, Wineries, etc.) - and who participates in any way in mixing, sale or service of alcohol for consumption at that business. In short, anybody who may/does/will handle alcohol is required to have a servers permit and complete alcohol server training. AACEA provides daily OLCC and WSLCB-approved classes in the Portland/Metro area and Northwest Oregon, the Seattle area, and online! You can complete online alcohol training from the comfort of your own home or come to one of our popular classes. At the end of our classes you will have your temporary permit in-hand, whether it's a new or renewal permit. If you're looking for your Washington State alcohol server's permit, check out our online training. The course can be completed from home in only 3 hours, and you can be at work in the service industry that day! America's Alcohol Certified Education Association is dedicated to promoting responsible alcohol sales and service through our course pack. Find out more today at www.aacea.com.

AACEA Launches Free Alcohol Server Certification Contest

Are you looking to get your alcohol server permit, or Class-12 certification in Washington? Lucky You! Get your bartender certification free – on us! Just tell us why you want to become a bartender, and we'll give one lucky bartender a full ride scholarship to our online alcohol certification class for free!

To enter, comment on our Facebook Page, or tweet @lenriggs on twitter, and use the hashtag #freealcoholservertraining.

For example, you could say “@lenriggs - I want to become a bartender because I make excellent flaming Dr. Peppers! #freealcoholservertraining” and you’re entered to win. It’s that easy!

The contest will be open until April 25 and if you win, you will experience free mandatory alcohol server training courtesy of Len Riggs and Americas Alcohol Certified Education Association. You can post on both FB and Twitter for 2 contest entries. You also get one entry for sharing our contest with YOUR friends on Twitter and one entry for sharing our contest on Facebook. That’s 4 chances to win – total!

If you need Washington alcohol server training, AACEA provides online alcohol server training courses that you can take from the comfort of your own home. Imagine getting your bartender certification in your pajamas, and heading to work later that day. It's that easy. Find out more at www.aacea.com.

Thanks to Contest Hound for helping us spread the word!

Across the US, Alcohol Consumption is Up.

According to USAToday:
Consumption of alcohol hit a 25-year high in 2010, when 67% of Americans reported drinking alcoholic beverages, according to a Gallup poll. That's a level unseen since the late 1970s, when 71% of Americans said they drank.
It's interesting to note:
Americans drank more wine than ever last year, 2.3 gallons apiece. That's up 35% since 1994. Spirits climbed 18% to 1.5 gallons per person for the same period, while beer intake dropped 7% to 20.7 gallons, says the Beer Institute.
What does the increase in alcohol consumption mean for certified alcohol servers? 1. Your establishment may be busier! Due to economic downturn, many people are looking for ways to blow off steam, or to get some valuable socialization time if they've been recently laid off. This might translate to an increase in customers who are looking for a cheap drink. 2. You may see an increase in intoxicated customers. Americans are consuming more alcohol on a whole - and more alcohol generally means more intoxication. It's important to have tactics for dealing with intoxicated customers and it's important to know when to say no. 3. You may see an increase in attempts at underage drinking. It's best to scrutinize scenarios in which you think your patron may be underage. It helps to familiarize yourself with local drivers' licenses and to adopt a policy for dealing with underage drinking. If you're looking to become a certified alcohol server and take online alcohol certification classes to get your Washington Server Permit or your Oregon server's permit, visit www.aacea.com. Each month, we raffle off $100 to a lucky student - put your name in the hat today by signing up for your mandatory alcohol server training with America's Alcohol Certified Education Association.

Alcohol in Movies linked to Underage Drinking

At America's Alcohol Certified Education Association, we are committed to responsible alcohol sales and service. Part of this is an attempt to make an impact on underage drinking. We found a particularly concerning report the other day stating that alcohol in movies has been linked to underage drinking. This large US study says that "Stars who knock back whiskey, wine, or beer in a movie are an invisible but potent force in prompting youngersters to experiment with alcohol or binge-drinking..." The study says this is a bigger risk for teen drinking that just having booze in the household. Reports on the survey said:
The youngsters were surveyed on what big movies they had seen, whether they drank alcohol or owned merchandise with a liquor brand on it, and were also asked questions about their personality, school and home life. ...The researchers then measured the amount of exposure to alcohol in movies, determined by a character's actual or implied consumption of a drink or purchase of it.
High exposure to alcohol consumption in films was ranked as the third biggest factor in the onset of drinking and the fourth biggest factor in the progression to binge drinking. 61% of Hollywood movies use some kind of product placement. Though producers are not allowed to use tobacco placements, they face no restrictions on product placement when it comes to alcohol. Alcohol consumption and branding in movies is mainly presented in positive sitiuations, with no negative affects, "which consolidates both the adolescent's identify as a drink and brand allegiance" the study warns. The best line of defense in underage drinking, for now, falls to alcohol servers. Many states require alcohol servers permits, which include training on how to spot fake ID's and curb underage drinking. To get your Washington State alcohol servers permit, take one of our online alcohol classes to become certified. Find out more at www.aacea.com.

Bartender Question: How do I Cut a Customer Off?

In the bartending industry, certified bartenders may find themselves facing rowdy customers who have had a little too much to drink. Knowing the signs of over-intoxication, and when to say no are part of responsible server training. America’s Alcohol Certified Education Association asked bartending pro Jeffrey Morgenthaler how to cut someone off - on the subject, he says, "Telling someone “No more” can lead to an uncomfortable situation. So that’s why I now try to approach the denial of alcohol from a hospitality-centric perspective: I’m the one who helped get you into this mess, and now I’m going to be the one who helps you get out of it – a bartender in every sense of the word." Some of the best methods for cutting unruly customers fall into the category of simply caring for your customer. You want them to continue to come back for a long time to come, which means that in no condition should they get in their car while inebriated. Jeffrey suggests simply explaining this to them - and then by suggesting food, soft drinks, water or coffee to over-inebriated guests, you keep them in a safe place, while giving them a little bit more time to sober up. The next step after diffusing the situation is to alert the rest of your crew, so that nobody continues to over-serve your guest. Bartenders who seem caring, who de-escalate the situation, and who offer to help clients seem to have the best results when cutting off customers. Many of Jeffrey's very smart readers also provided insight on this bartending conundrum. One reader mentioned "actively managing" your clientele. Heath says: "When I probably have had too much, bartenders often take far longer to come back to ask for my next drink than they usually do, or they forget the drinks I’ve ordered, or introduce me to someone who’s about to go have a cigarette. I appreciate these measures that let me save face (and sometimes not even notice that it’s happening), while having the same effect of keeping me from having far too much more to drink." One clever commenter mentioned a game she created to cut off inebriated customers. Cheryl says: "I had to come up with something creative. It’s my bartender nature to always bring humor into as much of life as possible, so I went out and bought an Operation game. I used the game for guests I felt should be cut-off. I’d pull it out with a big smile and tell the drunken soul that I would strike a deal with them. The rules were simple. Get all the bones out without the red buzzer nose going off and I’d serve them another drink. The game on the bartop was a magnet of fun and as you might have guessed, a big hit. The people that loved it the best were the local cops. They called it my sobriety test." By keeping your cool and being discrete about cutting someone off, you encourage your customers to continue returning to your establishment. Not only that - you diffuse potentially unsafe situations. AACEA's certified bartenders gain valuable experience like cutting off inebriated customers at our mandatory alcohol server training classes. We provide online alcohol server training, while promoting responsible service and sales of alcohol. To get your servers permit, visit www.aacea.com.

Behind the Bar Basics

At America's Alcohol Certified Education Association, we provide alcohol server classes for servers and bartenders to get their Class 12 permit in Washington. We are also committed to providing as much knowledge as possible to our bartenders-to-be. There's a lot more to becoming a bartender than just pouring drinks for paying customers. For anybody who's considering becoming a bartender there are a couple bartending basics that prepare any good bartender for the coming day: You must have the right tools and the right workspace. Behind the Bar Any bartender will tell you, organization is key. You don't want to be behind an unorganized bar, with a line of customers out the door who are waiting for drinks. This is frustrating for you as a bartender, and frustrating for your customers who won't understand why it takes so long to get a drink. You need to make sure you have access to everything you need for your shift - everything needs to be readily available or easy to grab without having to leave the bar. Keep your bar tools close, and make sure your most popular liquors are within arms' reach. It also helps to check the menu at your establishment and make sure that you have the ingredients available for any drink specials you might be offering. It also helps to have popular garnishes ready to go - especially citrus. Cut these up before hand and have them ready to go so you're not cutting fruit when your bar is the busiest. The Right Tools You won't get very far as a certified bartender if you don't have the right tools. These tools include strainers, shakers, bottle or can openers (a "churchkey" works well for both), a corkscrew for wine, and a few rags to mop up should anything spill. Safety is key, so it's handy to have a mat behind the bar along with a mop and broom for any mishaps. It's also important for certified alcohol servers to know a few different types of glasses for the drinks they'll be serving: Highball glasses are often taller than old fashioned glasses (or "rocks" glasses). Tumblers aren't the same size or shape as pint glasses. White and red wines have different size and shape openings. For more information on bartending school in Washington or to get your Mandatory Alcohol Server Training certification from home, visit www.aacea.com!

Boozy Bears: Dangerous to Underage Drinkers

Responsible alcohol sales includes being aware of underage drinking. Certified alcohol servers are constantly on the look out for minors who are trying to buy or consume alcohol. However, it's not always easy to spot underage drinking. A recent report on KFOR.com says that a new trend in underage drinking is "Boozy Bears". The substance is a mix of Gummi Bears and vodka, and can be incredibly dangerous for teens looking to experiment with alcohol. Since the alcohol is clear, the bears don't change color - making this new craze an almost imperceptible way to imbibe. The danger lies in the way the bears are consumed - many students swallow them whole, letting these "boozy bears" disintegrate once they've hit the stomach. The result is not immediate - but the buzz does come on strong. Many teens have cited the substance as a "sudden effect" and "much more intoxicating than you ever thought it would be." In the article on KFOR, sources reported that vodka seems to the most common among teens because it's clear and doesn't give off strong odors. The Oklahoma teens cited in the article also mentioned energy drinks or soda as mixers for alcohol and beer. The report cites the internet as one of the prime ways that teens are gaining access to alcohol. In fact, an online survey conducted by Teen Research Unlimited for the Wine & Spirits Wholesalers of America, Inc. found that millions of teens across the country have bought, or know other minors who have purchased alcohol via the Internet. Specifically, more than half a million teenagers admitted to have purchased alcohol from online alcohol shops and more than 3 million minors said they have a friend who has obtained alcohol in the same way. Alcohol servers need to constantly be on the lookout for underage drinking - staying ahead of the trends helps. AACEA is committed to providing alcohol server training focused on responsible alcohol service. For more information, or to find out how you can become a certified alcohol server, visit www.aacea.com.

Cocktail Competition Gives Bartenders a Shot

Tales of the Cocktail is in it's tenth year this year. The New Orleans cocktail festival offers a challenge for any certified bartender who knows their stuff. This coming July (25-29) bartenders will have a chance to face off, to create the best drink among their competitors. It's five days of cocktails, cuisine and culture. Annually held in New Orleans, this international event has something for cocktail professionals and enthusiasts alike with seminars, dinners, competitions and tasting rooms where brands showcase their latest products. Around the country, contestants are lining up their shots and creating delicious craft cocktails to please judges and tasters alike. Famous drinks such as the Absinthe Frappe, the Ramos Gin Fizz, the Obituary Cocktail, the Hurricane, the Hand Grenade and many others started with the imagination and creativity of New Orleans bartenders. To commemorate this grand tradition, “Tales of the Cocktail” was conceived in 2003 and has rapidly grown into one of the city’s favorite celebrations.

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At America’s Alcohol Certified Education Association, we are committed to responsible alcohol sales and service. We provide online class 12 permits and online class 13 permits. If you need to get your mandatory alcohol server training certificate, choose online alcohol classes that you can take from the comfort of your own home with AACEA.

Do Hangover Cures Work?

At America’s Alcohol Certified Education Association, we provide alcohol server classes for servers and bartenders to get their Class 12 permit in Washington. We are also committed to providing information that promotes responsible alcohol service.

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There are many folk cures that are supposed to help cure hangovers, and often these "cures" are designed to help replenish the vitamins and liquid you lost over night. Try all the cures you'd like - exercise, greasy food, juice - there really is no true cure for a hangover, but there are things drinkers can do to avoid having a hangover, and things drinkers can do to make themselves feel better afterwords.
  • Get hydrated: Before drinking, hydrate with both clear water and sports drinks that contain sugar and important minerals and salts.
  • Don't drink on an empty stomach: Before drinking, eat fat-containing foods and foods with high carbohydrate content. These ingredients slow absorption of alcohol in the stomach.
  • Avoid sugars: Sugar increases the speed of alcohol absorption.
  • Drink slowly: Sip the drink, and try to minimize the amount of total intake.
  • For those who get headaches right after drinking: Drink "headache-safe" beverages, such as white wine and light or clear-colored liquors.
  • Have an Ibuprofen: To prevent the effects of the hangover, you may be able to take anti-inflammation agents before drinking.
  • If soon-after or hangover headaches occur: Take an anti-inflammatory agent like Ibuprofen (you must wait several hours if you took one in advance of drinking) or an anti-migraine agent if you have them available.
  • Rehydrate: Drink water and sports drinks after your night out on the town. Avoid narcotic-containing painkillers or any ingredient containing acetaminophen (aka Tylenol). Alcohol can make those drugs deadly, and acetaminophen-containing products may cause serious liver damage when mixed with alcohol, which can sometimes be fatal.
  • Get a little exercise: A low-impact, or easy exercise may help boost your mood by releasing endorphins that are being suppressed by your hangover. A little light exercise can help alleviate that. Just make sure you're continuing to hydrate, since exercise and dehydration can cause serious problems.
While there's no one cure for a hangover besides rehydration, time and rest, the above tips may make your hangover hurt less. Another tip is to ask your bartender for a glass of water when you order an alcoholic beverage and space each drink out with a glass of water in between.

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To get your Mandatory Alcohol Server Training certification from the comfort of your own home, or to find out more about our bartending school in Washington, visit www.aacea.com.

Four Loko Cans Now Required to Show Alcohol Content

Four Loko - a caffeinated malt beverage - has been banned by Washington State Liquor Control after many college-age students were hospitalized because of the drink. The contrasting effects of caffeine and alcohol are said to somewhat cancel each other out, leading to higher consumption of the product. Those who are not used to drinking alochol may over-consume, causing alcohol-related injury. As an alcohol vendor, and as a part of being a responsible alcohol server, it's important to know that products like these have been banned. It's also important to know the effects of what Four Loko can do, and the average alcohol content in a can. Known among college students as "blackout in a can" this controversial product has been banned in other states, including Michigan for the same reason. A push is currently underway in New York and Oregon for a statewide sales ban. In one report, Four Loko manufacturer Phusion Projects defended its product, saying that can that warned of the drink's contents and called attention to the need for identification to purchase it. "The unacceptable incident at Central Washington University, which appears to have involved hard liquor... and possibly illicit substances," the statement read, "is precisely why we go to great lengths to ensure that our products are not sold to underage consumers and are not abused." Now, in a push from the FTC, Four Loko cans are required to state just how much alcohol the beverage has in it; a whopping 12%, which shows one can of Four Loko has approximately the same alcohol content as 4-5 cans of beer. The FTC alleges that Phusion misrepresented the amount of alcohol in those cans. Phusion has been known to state that one can of Four Loko is the equivalent of one to two regular cans of 12-ounce beers – instead of four to five cans. Phusion also has marketed these cans as a single serving, and the cans are not resealable, which encourages the drinker to consume the product all at once. Phusion considers it safe to consume a whole can of Four Loko, while the FTC considers consuming an entire can on a single occasion equivalent to “binge drinking.” Four Loko spokesperson and lobbyist Jim Halstrom says, "No one is more upset than we are when our products are abused or consumed illegally by underage drinkers, but we also believe curbing alcohol abuse or underage drinking will not be accomplished by singling out a lone product or beverage category. We think the true answer lies with increased education and awareness by all and with respect for the law." It seems as if the answer is two-fold. On one hand, the makers of Four Loko should be required to disclose information about the content of what's in their product. On the other hand, there is a responsibility by the vendors to check ID's - to make sure alcohol isn't being sold to minors, and to ensure products are not being sold to those who are intoxicated. Part of responsible alcohol service is knowing your part in matters like these. To get your mandatory alcohol servers permit, and take alcohol online classes from the comfort of your own home, visit www.aacea.com.

How Privatization of Alcohol Could Affect Washington State

If you are a Washington state resident and a registered voter (and even if you aren't), you have probably heard about initiative 1183 regarding privatization of the state alcohol system, passed last Tuesday. For those in the hospitality industry, it is important to stay informed on measures that affect how we do business. That's why we've been keeping tabs on the discussion on initiative 1183 and how it could affect the alcohol industry in Washington. The campaign for initiative 1183 was one of the most expensive campaigns in state history and there are a lot of issues on the line. On the initiative, a Huffington Post article writes:
"...Dubbed the 'Costco initiative' [this bill will] end state-run liquor stores in [Washington]. Sales in the state are currently only through stores run by the state's Liquor Control Board, a Prohibition-era policy. ...The new law would allow any store over 10,000 square feet to sell alcohol, along with continuing to allow the small contract stores under the current system to sell.... Convenience stores and gas stations would not be able to sell alcohol, however..."
The Moderate voice provided an interesting view on the subject, saying:
"The initiative would take Washington state out of both the distribution and retail sales business.... Washington state buys liquor from the source (or its representative), manages a central distribution warehouse, and sells liquor (and wine) in both state-run and contract liquor stores. Most of the public angst about I-1183 relates to retail sales, although the primary money behind the “vote no” campaign [was] from distributors, the middlemen in this deal... ...The most thorough examination of data over time (1950-2000), determined that 'Privatization had a significant permanent effect on the sale of spirits, but the effect was not large enough to affect total sales' and 'There was no significant effect on the number of fatal motor vehicle traffic accidents.'"
State-run liquor store employees, however, have cause to be concerned, as state-run liquor stores have 680 full-time employees and 714 hourly employees, who will no longer be employed by Washington state-run liquor stores after June 1. The new initiative also means layoffs for shipping companies like Kent-based Pozzi Trucking. They are one of four shipping companies delivering liquor to state stores. At AACEA, we’re committed to bringing you news on issues like these in the hospitality and beverage industry. AACEA provides online alcohol server training and bartending certification classes. To get your mandatory alcohol server training certificate today vist www.aacea.com. Each month, AACEA raffles off $100 to one of our MAST students - sign up today and be eligible to win.

In the Service of Care

Too many people all crammed into a bar, the sway back, rock forward, tipsy movements. There she comes again, that specimen of service, gracing everyone with smiles, gentle excuses, and spirits. She weaves through the crowd, never stopping, never dropping. Her heart beats to the rhythm of the music, her hand twitches through her tickets, and her mind keeps track of all the loose ends. In the corner, a dark space, far against the wall, she keeps an eye on those two love birds, filling the glass, or stopping to ask if the comfort is still there. Also, at arms length, she watches those bodies, all of those bodies, because her word is the law when it comes to making sure safety is upheld. Her service requires care for every individual, a blessing and a curse, as they beckon, are denied, yell and scream, blink and babble. Unexpectedly, righteously, she stands between that door. No one leaves with their breath on fire, or their track off kilter. A cab can be called, or a friend, and she knows just what to do, water and well wishing keeps this smile in service. -- The Author, Alexandra Erwin, is one of our runners up in the Scholarship to Save Lives competition. In addition to our $500 scholarship, we selected 3 recipients for a runner-up prize of $100. Thank you so much to Alexandra and to all of our entrants. AACEAprovides alcohol server training which promotes responsible service and sales of alcohol. AACEA is hosting a raffle for students enrolled in our alcohol server training classes – sign up today and you’re eligible to win $100 from AACEA and Len Riggs. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington visit www.aacea.com.

Inspections in Indiana Find Fewer Sales to Minors

Indiana recently passed a law requiring all carry-out alcohol customers to show ID when purchasing alcohol, regardless of age. The law was largely ridiculed; however, after the law was enacted, officers completed inspections on underage sales of alcohol, saying that sales to minors was down over 40% since 2009. During the inspections, people ages 18 to 20 accompany officers and try to buy alcohol. Indiana business owners are "getting the message about not serving to minors after being hit with citations and fines," said a Courier Press article. Indiana Excise Police Officer Travis Thickstun said that along with laws mandating certified server training, the tougher ID requirements helped improve compliance. The mandatory server classes, which last about two hours, cover not over-serving to intoxicated customers, how to spot fake IDs, and basic alcohol laws in the state. "Liquor store owners supported the stricter ID law," says the Courier Press article. "...It wasn't that inconvenient and it led to a drastic drop in attempts by minors to buy alcohol because they knew clerks had to card all customers." Laws like these help reduce the risks of alcohol, from service-to-minors to drunk driving. Like Indiana, Washington state also requires mandatory alcohol server training. This spring, Indiana revised their card law so that store clerks are no longer required to card customers who reasonably appear older than 40, similar to laws in Washington state. If you're looking to take bartending certification classes, or to complete your mandatory alcohol server training, AACEA has an easy online alcohol server training program to fit your needs. Sign up today and you’re eligible to win $100 from AACEA and Len Riggs. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington visit www.aacea.com.

Iowa Youths help Combat Underage Drinking

Iowa Youths are helping to combat underage drinking in their state - pushing for stiffer laws. These measures include changing Iowa's Minor-In-Posession law to include consumption, and adding a "social host" law, barring any adult from allowing minors to drink alcohol on their property. In that case, parents and other adults who allow minors to drink on their property or under their supervision would be guilty of a misdemeanor and could face fines. Students say the changes would extend penalties to adults, which would encourage them to be more vigilant against underage drinking in their homes. The DesMoines register reports:
The state’s current law on possession of alcohol by minors covers only physical possession of an alcoholic beverage, meaning that a person could simply drop a container holding alcohol to avoid a charge, advocates said. By expanding the law to include consumption, a young person could be charged with a violation if he failed a breath or blood-alcohol test.
Measures like these would help those in the alcohol industry - certified bartenders and certified alcohol servers - to ensure that everyone in their community is responsible for the task of cutting down on underage drinking. America’s Alcohol Certified Education Association is dedicated to promoting responsible alcohol sales and service through our course pack. If you’re looking for your Washington State alcohol server‘s permit, check out our online alcohol certification that allows you to get your permit from the comfort of your own home. Find out more today at www.aacea.com.

Montana DUI Task Force Holds First Alcohol Sales and Service Training Class

The Lewis and Clark county DUI task force, along with Youth Connections, held its first Responsible Alcohol Sales and Service Training Class Tuesday. In an effort to prevent underage drinking, and auto accidents involving alcohol Montana passed a Mandatory Responsible Alcohol Sales and Service Training Act, requiring all places that sell alcoholic beverages train their servers and sales staff to recognize intoxicated or under-age patrons. Training has to be completed by September 30, 2011. In accordance with this new legislation, a DUI task force in Lewis and Clark County conducted its first Alcohol Sales and Service Training Class, handing out Certificates of Completion from the Montana Department of Revenue-Liquor License Control. Now, any Montana server who stocks shelves, serves, supervises and manages an establishment with alcohol must take the class, aimed at reducing the impact of alcohol impairment and impaired driving. From an article in the Helena Independent Record on Alcohol Server Training: "The class... focuses on things like how to spot a fake ID, the law that prohibits sales to anyone 'who is apparently, obviously or actually intoxicated,' and the personal civil liability a server or seller carries if an underage or over-served individual gets behind the wheel. These topics teach [attendees] how to do their job responsibly while keeping themselves, their customers, and the community safe. "This is a hot button topic in communities around Montana. For the first time in Montana’s history, a bartender and manager were charged criminally after they over served the man who hit Trooper Michael Haynes head on. Trooper Haynes died as a result of his injuries. This criminal charge embodies a shift being seen across Montana as lawmakers grapple to get a handle on the state’s overwhelming DUI problem. Alcohol sellers and servers are being held accountable for those they serve who get behind the wheel after they over indulge." America's Alcohol Certified Education Association provides mandatory alcohol server training, promoting responsible service and sales of alcohol. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington or to get your alcohol servers permit in Oregon, visit www.aacea.com.

Rewarding Designated Drivers

Designated drivers are being rewarded for their sobriety by bars in Massachusetts. In an initiative to cut down on drunk driving, patrons who announce that they are the designated driver in their party receive free sodas from participating establishments. One of these establishments, Tinker's Son Pub in Norwell MA, began rewarding its designated drivers a year ago, after hearing about the initiative's success in other pubs in the area. Participating restaurants post a sticker near the door announcing their participation in the program. Many certified bartenders and certified alcohol servers ask large groups if they’ve designated a sober driver for the night. Police in the Norwell area encouraged this measure after a fatal holiday crash in 2002. At America's Alcohol Certified Education Association, we applaud this measure to cut down on drunk driving, which takes the lives of thousands of people every year. In fact, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported in 2007 that nearly 18,000 highway deaths were "alcohol-related." It's up to alcohol servers to help cut down on the number of fatal alcohol-related accidents by providing responsible alcohol service and sales. If you're looking for mandatory alcohol server training, AACEA provides online alcohol server training, which you can take from the comfort of your own home in only 3 hours. Start the New Year off right, with a program tailored to your needs. Find out more about our MAST classes at www.aacea.com.

Safety, Insurance, Auto and Alcohol Groups Push for Drunk Driving Research

A coalition of safety, auto, insurance and alcohol industry groups have asked Congress to pass legislation providing funding for an advanced drunk driving detection research program. The program is expected to lead to more than 8,000 fewer highway fatalities each year, saving our country approximately $130 billion annually. The letter says this legislation "would authorize the transfer of currently unused safety funds at a rate of $12 million annually for five years to support and expand the ongoing DADSS (Driver Alcohol Detection System for Safety) research program currently being undertaken by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and leading automakers." "The goal of this research program is to develop a publicly-supported technology for vehicles that will instantaneously and passively detect if a driver is drunk (above the legal limit of .08 BAC) and prevent the vehicle from starting. The technology must also be extremely accurate, inexpensive and a non-invasive optional safety feature." To read more about the proposed legislation, click here. At AACEA, we teach that our students are the first line of defense against drunk driving. We provide alcohol server training which promotes responsible service and sales of alcohol. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington or to get your alcohol servers permit in Oregon, visit www.aacea.com. Sign up today and you’re eligible to win our monthly $100 raffle, from AACEA and Len Riggs.

Scholarship to Save Lives Runner Up Arieshia Watson

When I first began serving tables at eighteen, I was the youngest in my restaurant. I can remember going through the class learning about the dangers of serving alcohol to different types of people and being extremely afraid to take on the challenge. In my restaurant I trained for five days and at minimum three of those day involved liquor and its hazards. As I acknowledged the responsibility, I decided to take it on full force accepting the opportunity and the privilege that I was given. Now at twenty, I can recall many incidences where my authority has been questioned because of my youth. But, every time I ask for a person's ID I remember that I could be the direct cause of an incident involving alcohol. Not only is it important for me to properly serve alcohol, but it runs even more crucial when I legally can't drink it myself. The risk of a federal offense seems to be more of an incentive to work hard, keeping drunk drivers off of the road. Most people don't realize how serious over-serving alcohol or serving to minors truly is. I am proud to say that I know the risks and I work exceptionally hard to maintain a safe environment during my time serving. Giving this responsibility to young adults at my age can be very stressful because of the consequences that alcohol consumption can bring. I believe that my Liquor license is one of the most vital pieces of paper that I will ever have, and I feel rewarded as I can say that I earn it every day. -- Author, Arieshia Watson, is one of our runners up in the Scholarship to Save Lives competition. In addition to our $500 scholarship, we selected 3 recipients for a runner-up prize of $100. Thank you so much to Arieshia and to all of our entrants. AACEAprovides alcohol server training which promotes responsible service and sales of alcohol. AACEA is hosting a raffle for students enrolled in our alcohol server training classes – sign up today and you’re eligible to win $100 from AACEA and Len Riggs. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington visit www.aacea.com.

Scholarship to Save Lives Winner!

AACEA and Len Riggs want to send out a special thank you to everyone who entered our Scholarship to Save Lives competition. We picked a winner: Will Franz who wrote this original composition. Click to listen to: Send a Friend-Will Franz Verse 1 Just sittin' alone as I watch his expressions change Thinking only God knows if he's ever going to change his ways But he promised me it's the last time we'd be out on a school night A 34 old man should know what's right Verse 2 A couple hours in and he's stumblin' pretty hard He polished off his last drink as I guide us out to the car But he claims he's fine to drive us home I just wish he'd call a cab instead An eight-year-old should be in bed Chorus Oh lend a hand I know you hear me so please will you lend a hand Oh send a friend Please pretty Angel I need oh I need a friend Oh please don't forget me tonight Verse 3 My tired eyes stayed glued to all the passing cars We kept drifting left and right but we've made it out pretty far And I know we were so close to home, there couldn't be a mile left Just please hear my prayer to live Chorus Oh lend a hand I know you hear me so please will you lend a hand Oh send a friend Please pretty Angel I need oh I need a friend Oh please don't forget me tonight Oh please don't forget me Bridge The man before me now is not the man I held so high He's got to give it up and gain control And become the dad I've been waiting for Maybe then we can start another life Chorus Oh lend a hand I know you hear me so please will you lend a hand Oh send a friend Please pretty Angel I need oh I need a friend Oh please don't forget me tonight Oh please don't forget me tonight We're truly amazed to have such talented entrants! Thank you to everyone who participated, and remember, AACEAprovides alcohol server training which promotes responsible service and sales of alcohol. AACEA is hosting a raffle for students enrolled in our alcohol server training classes – sign up today and you’re eligible to win $100 from AACEA and Len Riggs. To get your alcohol servers permit in Washington visit www.aacea.com.

Louisiana Bar Card and Washington State MAST permit. Arizona Title 4 Basic Training Online AZ DLLC Alcohol Server Approved Certification Course California Responsible Beverage Service RBS TIPS Certificate Program On Off Premises ABC Florida Vendor State Compliant Montana Ohio Seller For Sellers Servers Bartenders and Managers Get your TABC Certification for selling serving alcohol in Texas Your official can be printed online upon completion Utah Mobile Friendly valid Bartender School on off premise server training permit classes by Len Riggs

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