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Servers & Bartenders – How to Prevent Customers from Drinking and Driving in Utah

In Utah State it is illegal to serve alcohol to someone to the point of intoxication. In other words, you are not allowed to get your customers drunk or to serve alcohol to a customer who is already drunk!

This should be simple, right?

Unfortunately, it can be difficult at times to determine if a customer has gone past their limit or are near the point of intoxication if they are naturally good at hiding obvious signs of intoxication (some people are professional alcoholics, after all) or if they had consumed a few drinks prior to entering your establishment.

In the instance you do come across a drunk customer (whether you are responsible for their inebriated state or not), you may be called upon to use your persuasive skills to sway them from attempting to drive home in their drunken stupor.

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The Keys To Customer Observation For Texas Alcohol Servers

In Texas State it is illegal to sell or serve alcohol to someone who is intoxicated, and observing customers for signs of intoxication is a server’s best course of action for preventing alcohol from being served or sold to an intoxicated customer.

Let’s review some Keys to Customer Observation for preventing alcohol sales and service to intoxicated individuals below!

Keys to Customer Observation for Alcohol Servers

  1. First thing’s first, always pay attention to how your customers look!
    • Are their eyes red and watery?
    • Do they look overly tired?
    • Are they looking a little disheveled? (e.g. tussled hair, untied shoes, untucked shirts, etc.)
    • Do they smell strongly of alcohol?
  2. Next, observe what your customers are doing!
    • Are they struggling to keep themselves balanced when standing still?
    • Has walking become a challenge for them?
    • Do they slur their words when they speak?
    • Are they being overly loud or excited?
    • Are they taking frequent trips to the restroom?
  3. Then, observe how your customers are reacting to various stimuli.
    • When you ask them a question, does it take them a long time to formulate an answer?
    • Do they respond to your questions slowly and with great effort?
    • Are they giggling or laughing at your jokes in an overly-animated way?
  4. Lastly, keep tabs on how much alcohol has been purchased or consumed by your customers!
    • This shouldn’t be your only method for determining a customer’s level of intoxication since they will often begin drinking at home or in another establishment before frequenting yours, but counting drinks can still provide you with a general idea of where a customer may be at on the BAC scale!

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AACEA Oregon: Series - Most Common Oregon Liquor Licenses: Learn About the Full On-Premises Sales (F) License!

If you’re planning to open up an establishment that will sell or serve alcohol, you’re going to want to know which Oregon Liquor License will suit your vision best before beginning the application process!

We're putting together a series about various OLCC Liquor Licenses, but in this post we’re going to specifically talk about the Full On-Premises Sales (F) License.

Question: What sort of establishment would a Full On-Premises Sales (F) License be best for?

Answer: Full On-Premises Sales (F) Licenses work well for fine dining restaurants, neighborhood/family restaurants, nightclubs, hotels, and private clubs.

The F license is great for establishments that plan to sell hard liquor (distilled spirits), beer, wine, and cider by the drink for customers to consume within the grounds of the establishment. In other words, this license does not permit your customers to take drinks to go UNLESS your business also has an Off-On-Premises Sales license.

The only two exceptions to this rule are:

  1. Your customers can take a partially consumed bottle of wine home with them if it was served during their meal.
  2. Your customers can purchase beer to take home with them as long as it is dispensed in a securely covered container (growler) that the customer provides.

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AACEA Washington: What Are Acceptable Forms of Identification For Alcohol Sales & Service In Washington State?

It is guaranteed that if you serve or sell alcohol in Washington State you’re going to find yourself checking a whole lotta IDs! This means you’re going to come across several different styles of IDs, but not all IDs are acceptable to use for alcohol transactions.

The first step you’ll need to take when a customer hands you their ID is to make sure it is considered an acceptable form of identification per the Washington State Liquor Control Board (WSLCB) for confirming someone’s age. This is important, because if you accept and check an unacceptable form of ID for someone and then serve or sell them alcohol you can get in BIG trouble! Especially if you find out that person deceived you and was not actually 21 or older!

Below is a list of the WSLCB approved forms of identification that are considered acceptable for the purpose of selling, serving, or purchasing alcohol in Washington State:

  1. U.S. Driver’s License
  2. U.S. Instruction Permit
  3. U.S. ID Card
  4. Canadian Province Driver’s License
  5. Canadian Province Instruction Permit
  6. Canadian Province ID Card
  7. U.S. Armed Forces ID Card
  8. Merchant Marine I.D. Card
  9. Official Passport or Passport Card
  10. Washington State Tribal Enrollment Card

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AACEA Florida: Basic Florida Alcohol Serving Laws For Servers & Bartenders

If you’re hoping to get a better understanding of Florida’s alcohol laws (whether it be for alcohol serving purposes or drinking purposes), we have put together a list of the top must-know Florida drinking laws below for your reference!

How old do I need to be in Florida State to bartend?

18

How old do I need to be in Florida State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

18

How old do I need to be in Florida State to conduct alcohol tastings?

18

How old do I need to be in Florida State to enter a bar?

18 There are several cities within Florida that have enacted a 21 and up minimum age policy. So even though 18 is Florida’s legal age to enter a bar, there are several bars that only allow individuals who are 21 or older to set foot inside the bar.

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AACEA California: Must-Know California Alcohol Serving Laws

Hey Californians! If you are in the hospitality industry and serve alcohol during your job (whether you’re a bartender, waitstaff, or you serve alcohol in some other capacity while on the job) you’re definitely going to want to know and understand California drinking laws to keep yourself out of trouble!

Likewise, if you’re hoping to participate in drinking activities within California state (whether you’re from in or out of state), the below basic California alcohol laws will be helpful for you to know as well!

How old do I need to be in California State to bartend?

21

How old do I need to be in California State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

18

How old do I need to be in California State to conduct alcohol tastings?

21

How old do I need to be in California State to enter a bar?

21

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AACEA Arizona: Arizona Must-Know Alcohol Laws - Simplified!

Arizonians! If you are a bartender, server, or manager who oversees employees who engage in alcohol transactions, or if you’re planning to enter the hospitality industry in Arizona, you’re going to need to know Arizona’s alcohol laws and adhere to them while on the job. Likewise, if you are a customer who wants to engage in drinking festivities within Arizona State, these basic laws will be beneficial for you to know.

How old do I need to be in Arizona State to bartend?

19

How old do I need to be in Arizona State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

19

How old do I need to be in Arizona State to conduct alcohol tastings?

19

How old do I need to be in Arizona State to enter a bar?

21 There are a few exceptions to this law:

  1. A minor can enter a bar if they are with their parent, legal guardian or spouse of legal age
  2. Underage military members and veterans may enter a bar if it is classified as a club
  3. Employees who are at least 19 can be in a bar to perform their job duties

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AACEA Utah: Basic Utah Alcohol Laws Every Server Should Know!

Curious about Utah’s liquor laws? We put together a list of some of the most important alcohol laws you need to know in Utah as an alcohol seller or server, or even as a customer or someone who wants to participate in alcoholic festivities in Utah State.

How old do I need to be in Utah State to bartend?

21

How old do I need to be in Utah State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

21

How old do I need to be in Utah State to conduct alcohol tastings?

21

How old do I need to be in Utah State to enter a bar?

21

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AACEA Ohio: Basic Ohio Alcohol Serving Laws Every Server Should Know!

Ohio State does not require that alcohol servers (bartenders, waitstaff, etc.) or alcohol sellers (liquor store staff, grocery store staff, etc.) take a Responsible Alcohol Sales & Service course and receive a certificate, however, the Ohio Department of Liquor Control does still require all employees who are involved in alcohol transactions with customers to know and adhere to Ohio State Liquor Laws.

We have curated the top must-know Ohio Alcohol Laws below for your reference!

How old do I need to be in Ohio State to bartend?

21

How old do I need to be in Ohio State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

19

How old do I need to be in Ohio State to conduct alcohol tastings?

19 For beer & wine tastings

21 For liquor tastings

How old do I need to be in Ohio State to enter a bar?

Varies The answer to this question oftentimes varies depending on the establishment. Some establishments only allow individuals who are 21 or older to enter, while others allow individuals who are at least 18 to enter. Some establishments even allow individuals who are under 18 to enter if they are accompanied by a legal parent or guardian who is 21 or older.

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AACEA Montana: Basic Montana Alcohol Laws You Should Know!

Are you curious about Montana’s alcohol laws? Perhaps you work in the hospitality industry or are planning to begin working for the hospitality industry in Montana State and could use this information to expand your knowledge for your job. Or maybe you’re visiting Montana (or are planning to visit) and would like to know Montana drinking laws ahead of time. Whatever the reason may be, we have provided some of the most basic Montana alcohol laws below for your reference!

How old do I need to be in Montana State to bartend?

18

How old do I need to be in Montana State to serve alcohol as waitstaff?

18

How old do I need to be in Montana State to conduct alcohol tastings?

18

How old do I need to be in Montana State to enter a bar?

Varies The answer to this question varies depending on the establishment. Some establishments only allow individuals who are 21 or older to enter. Some establishments allow individuals who are at least 18 to enter, and other establishments allow individuals who are under 18 to enter if they are with their adult (over 21) parent or guardian.

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